Traveling Exhibits

MOA Traveling Exhibits

The Museum of the Albemarle has spread beyond its own facility in the recent years. Traveling exhibits are an excellent way to reach out to the more rural areas of the 13 county region. We want to be able to educate beyond our bick and mortar building, and we are greatful to form partnerships with facilities that will display our traveling exhibits. Below is a list of current traveling exhibits that are available to use for your facility. Panels for exhibits can be hung by gravity cleats attached to the wall.

Please contact our staff to request exhibits:

Lynette Sawyer, Museum Specialist, at lynette.sawyer@ncdcr.gov

Wanda Lassiter, Curator, at wanda.lassiter@ncdcr.gov

or call (252) 335-1453


Flying Kites with Delia

Flying Kites with Delia traveling exhibition tells the history of kites and their usage in northeastern North Carolina as told by the narrator, Delia, a delta kite. The eleven-paneled exhibit is written for elementary ages children with historical images and colorful sketches.

Contributions of graphics and research to the exhibit from institutions such as Kitty Hawk Kites, the National Air and Space Museum, and the Library of Congress. The Museum of the Albemarle extends its greatest thanks to artist Tyler Rivas for the wonderful sketches and to Kitty Hawk Kites for the donation of the kites. The Museum also thanks the Friends of the Museum of the Albemarle for making this traveling exhibit possible.

Exhibition Specifications

  • 11 Primary Panels, 2’ wide x 3’ high.
  • Panels can be hung using gravity cleats and screws.
  • Two kites compliments of Kitty Hawk Kites with hanging mechanisms

 

Participation:

  • No cost to borrow the exhibit.
  • Transportation, installation, and dismounting provided by Museum of the Albemarle staff.
  • Typical loan period is 3-6 months.
  • Only to be displayed indoors.

Memorable Sands: Beaches of Northeast North Carolina and Southeast Virginia

Memorable Sands:  Beaches of Northeast North Carolina and Southeast Virginia features images from African American beaches in the region including Chowan Beach in Hertford County, Bias and Hargraves Beaches in Currituck County, Bogues Beach in Pasquotank County and Seaview Beach in Virginia.  During the hot days of summer, thousands of local residents and visitors gather at regional beaches and swimming holes to cool off. In the early to mid-1900s, beaches were segregated with white and African American beach-goers sharing the same water, but not the same sand. Segregation had denied ethnic groups, such as African Americans and American Indians, access to public beaches.  As a result, members of these communities began to develop their own in the late 1920s. Throughout the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, summer at these beaches meant a time and place where visitors could socialize, relax, swim, picnic, enjoy music, and take part in other various recreational activities. Memorable Sands seeks to capture these memories and share them for all to enjoy. Contributions of graphics and research to the exhibit from institutions such as Elizabeth City State University, the Chowan Discovery Group, the North Carolina Museum of History, and Meyera E. Oberndorf Central Library, Virginia Beach, Virginia were very valuable in making this exhibit possible. The Museum extends its greatest to thanks Frank Stephenson, Jr. for his interest and foresight in collecting items related to Chowan Beach. The Museum also thanks the Friends of the Museum of the Albemarle for making this traveling exhibit possible.

Exhibition Specifications (width x height):

  • 6 Primary Panels
    • Opening 35 ½” x 53”
    • Beating the Heat 35 ½” x 54”
    • Rhythm of the Beach 35 ½” x 54”
    • Nearby Beaches 35 ½” x 54”
    • Attendance Decline 35 ½” x 54”
    • Thank You 40” x 20”
  • 13 Secondary Panels
    • Beating the Heat secondary panels 40” x 20” – 18” x 18” – 18” x 18”
    • Rhythm of the Beach secondary panel 21 ½” x 35 ½”
    • Nearby Beaches secondary panels 40” x 20” – 40” x 20”
    • Attendance Decline secondary panels 18” x 18” – 18” x 18”
    • Juke Box secondary panel 20” x 40”
    • Posters 25” x 40” – 24” x 18” – 18” x 24”

Courtesy Panel 17 ½” x 31”

Participation:

  • No cost to borrow the exhibit.
  • Transportation, installation, and dismounting provided by Museum of the Albemarle staff.
  • Typical loan period is 3-6 months.
  • Only to be displayed indoors.

Post from the Coast

Postcards are often overlooked as valuable research tools and sources of information.  Not only are they illustrative and tell a story, they also serve as markers of pop-culture.  Post from the Coast traveling exhibit highlights postcards from the collections of the Museum of the Albemarle and local collector Gary Cooper. Old and new, the examples chosen depict coastal North Carolina scenes of beaches, transportation, architecture, and fun. Adding to the experience, several cards have been enhanced for viewing with 3-D glasses provided by Biggs Cadillac Buick GMC and Tandem Incorporated. Learn about their development, and take in this diverse collection of posts from the coast. The Museum also thanks the Friends of the Museum of the Albemarle for making this traveling exhibit possible.

Exhibition Specifications:

  • 6 Primary Panels, 57" wide x 40" high.
  • 5 Secondary Panels, 28" wide x 48" high.

 

Participation:

  • No cost to borrow the exhibit.
  • Transportation, installation, and dismounting provided by Museum of the Albemarle staff.
  • Typical loan period is 3-6 months.
  • Only to be displayed indoors.

Women Making History

North Carolina Women Making History traces the lives of ordinary women from 1585 to the mid-1990s. Throughout time, women have traditionally held private roles in our society including caring for the sick, raising families, maintaining households and educating children. Over the years a woman’s role extended beyond the home to include roles in politics, economics, and even the military.

In the exhibit, visitors will catch a glimpse into the lives of women such as Elizabeth Horniblow (tavern operator in Edenton, NC), Harriet Jacobs (former slave and author also from Edenton), Charlotte Hawkins Brown (who opened the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, NC), and Lillian Exum Clement (first woman elected to the NC General Assembly).

Photographs on the exhibit panels reflect young girls working in textile mills, students at Elizabeth City State Colored Normal School, female nurses during World War II, women protesting the use of nuclear power, and a Cherokee woman in her mountain home. The Museum thanks the Friends of the Museum of the Albemarle and the North Carolina Museum of History for making this traveling exhibit possible.

Exhibition Specifications:

  • 10 Primary Panels, 36" wide x 36" high.

Participation:

  • No cost to borrow the exhibit.
  • Transportation, installation, and dismounting provided by Museum of the Albemarle staff.
  • Typical loan period is 3-6 months.
  • Only to be displayed indoors.

Steeped in Time: Tea and Traditions

Steeped in Time: Tea and Traditions highlights the centuries old history of one of the world’s favorite beverages.  Across the globe, tea is consumed second only to water.  Hot, cold, sweet or unsweet, this drink has helped shaped modern society and continues to grow in popularity. Visitors will learn how tea is grown and manufactured; how it is shipped; how it is prepared; what items have been used over the centuries to prepare and drink it; and about the many customs centered on this all-important drink. 

Exhibition Specifications:

  • 6 Primary Panels,28" wide x 36" high. 
  • 4 Secondary Panels, 28" wide x 28" high.
  •  

Participation:

  • No cost to borrow the exhibit.
  • Transportation, installation, and dismounting provided by Museum of the Albemarle staff.
  • Typical loan period is 3-6 months.
  • Only to be displayed indoors.