See Our Exhibits

Current Exhibits

Our Story: Life in the Albemarle

The Albemarle is a unique place—half land, half water. Our ever changing relationship with the water has defined our way of life. Water is both a highway and a barrier, a source of livelihood and inspiration. The story of this place is Our Story, a tale of how our communities have adapted to challenges and opportunities of our unusual home. This is a long-term exhibit with no closing date.

 

North Carolina Shad Boat

The Official State Historic Boat of North Carolina was first built in the early 1880s by George Washington Creef of Roanoke Island. The shad boat on display here at MOA was built in 1904 by renowned boat builder and decoy carver, Alvirah Wright. This is a long-term exhibit with no closing date. 

 

River Bridge: Sunken Secrets 

This exhibition is based on excavations at a site along the Pasquotank River north of Elizabeth City. The site’s name comes from a bridge built before the Revolutionary War and noted by George Washington when he visited the area. At one time, ships could navigate to a customshouse and a set of warehouses, where workers unloaded and loaded cargo. Today, the only reminders of this once-important center of commerce include a few pilings and several vessels submerged just below the river’s surface, as well as a large collection of artifacts spotlighted in this exhibit.

Excavations at the River Bridge site over the past seven years have yielded over 10,000 artifacts that date from the middle of the 18th century to the early 20th century. The artifacts’ condition, and the fact that many items remain intact, makes the site unique. These objects provide a glimpse into colonial and Federal period trade patterns in eastern North Carolina.

The River Bridge site was first issued a permit number from the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology in 2011 with an objective to “explore a location in the Pasquotank River noted as an early colonial port.” The underwater excavations have yielded artifacts from pearlware, creamware, gray salt-glazed Westerwald stoneware, and earthenware dairy pans to case bottles and flasks, axes, faunal and botanical artifacts, shoes, shingles, and personal effects including chamber pots, scissors, and buttons.

River Bridge: Sunken Secrets, remains on view until March 2021.

 

Blue Lodges of the Albemarle

The Museum of the Albemarle will open its latest small exhibit, Blue Lodges of the Albemarle, on March 16, 2019.  This exhibition recognizes our Albemarle region’s Freemasons and the charitable works they perform in and around their communities.  A fascinating assortment of artifacts, from several Albemarle Masonic Lodges, reveal both the fraternity’s rich history in Northeastern North Carolina and their time-honored philanthropic heritage. 

Blue Lodges of the Albemarle, remains on view through January 4, 2020.

 

Clucker Plucker

This small lobby exhibition pairs local folk art with agricultural equipment for a tongue and cheek look at one of the world's most popular animals -- the chicken!

Clucker Plucker, remains on view until November 16, 2019.

 

High on the Hog

The Museum of the Albemarle will open its newest exhibit on September 28th, 2019. High on the Hog, will look at how pigs have become a part of our family, home, and livelihood.

The expression “half land, half water” describes the area of northeastern North Carolina. And on that land, hogs have been raised, butchered, and processed for generations. Hogs have found their way into our lives and culture, playing a significant role for families in northeastern North Carolina. Whether a vital source of food and income for regional families or an ingredient in recipes and medicinal and everyday products, hogs are considered cultural icons. The High on the Hog exhibition, which opens September 28th, 2019 will look at how pigs have become a part of our family, home, and livelihood.

Artifacts on display in the exhibit will include hog catchers, bills of sales, account books, plantation records, hog scrapers, cookbooks, hog scalding vat, butcher knives, a crackling press, lard paddles, a butcher block and prize-winning State Fair banners.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

High on the Hog, remains on view until September, 2022.

 

Luther "Wimpy" Lassiter Pool Table

The Museum of the Albemarle will open its newest exhibit on Oct. 8th, 2019. Luther “Wimpy” Lassiter Pool Table, is a small exhibit featuring the pool table of Luther “Wimpy” Lassiter, who was the winner of the World Pocket Billiard Championship in years 1955, 1957, 1963, 1964, 1966, and 1967.

We will display a pool table that belonged to Luther “Wimpy” Lassiter. Lassiter was the winner of the World Pocket Billiard Championship in years 1955, 1957, 1963, 1964, 1966, and 1967. He won the Legendary Billiard Stars Tournament in 1983 at age 65. Born 1918 in Elizabeth City, Luther reportedly received his nickname “Wimpy” from his fondness of consuming as many hot dogs as Popeye’s friend Wimpy consumed hamburgers. Luther was also considered one of the greatest nine-ball players of
all time.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Luther “Wimpy” Lassiter Pool Table, remains on view until November 16, 2019.

 

A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans

The Museum of the Albemarle will open its newest exhibit on Nov 8th, 2019. A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans is a traveling exhibit featuring a collection of images, assembled by photographer Martin Tucker, taken by North Carolina soldiers in Vietnam.

The Vietnam War took place literally half a world away from the United States; life for the soldiers was an unknown to most Americans in the 1960s and 1970s. Many only knew the war from images on TV—some of which were quite graphic.

But what did the war look like to the troops on the ground? Some recorded the horrors of war; others focused less on the war and more on the experience—their friendships, the Vietnamese people, the countryside, the longing for home.

This collection of intriguing images explores the human elements and experiences of Vietnam, with commentary by the veterans on what each image means to them. This exhibit offers visitors the chance to see how the troops themselves chose to remember their time in Southeast Asia.

“Vietnam was a complex conflict, ushering in a new type of warfare: a war without borders,” said Charlie Knight, military curator at the North Carolina Museum of History. “When Martin Tucker originally collected these images and the stories that go with them, he provided a glimpse into a very turbulent time period in U.S. history. The images in 1000 Words convey what everyday life was like for those in uniform in Vietnam, and we hope that visitors will gain a greater understanding of this war 50 years ago.”

According to Tucker, “The photographs paint as broad a picture as possible . . . of what 18- to 20-year-old young men experienced in their year away from home (in addition to combat)—and how they chose to document it. They’re showing what they couldn’t say.”

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans, remains on view until April 30, 2020.